2002–2003

April 3, 2003

Misogynism, Anti-Judaism, and Repressed Sexuality: Reassessing Biblical Women

Our cultural legacies of sexism, Christian triumphalism, and body/soul dualism continue to influence biblical interpretation. Professor Amy-Jill Levine in the inaugural lecture of the Women and Religion Lectures challenged these influences and so their continuing effects through the introduction of the categories of gender, sexuality, and women's history into the discipline.

Professor Levine is the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Professor of New Testament Studies and Director of the Carpenter Program in Religon, Gender, and Sexuality at Vanderbilt University Divinity School. She has published numerous works on Christian origins, Jewish-Christian relations, and sexuality, gender, and the Bible. She is currently the editor of The Feminist Companions to the New Testament and Early Christian Literature (Continuum/Sheffield Academic Press).

The lecture was given at 7:00 p.m. in lecture hall G4 of the New Science Building. The lecture was co-sponsored by the Women's and Gender Studies Program and the Klutznick Chair in Jewish Civilization.


February 24, 2003

War with Iraq?

The Critical Issues Forum considered the moral and legal impications of the possible war against Iraq.

Joining Roger Bergman, Moderator of the Critical Issues Fora and Director of the Justice and Peace Studies program, were:

Dr. Russell Reno, Ph.D.Theology Department
Fr. Dennis Hamm, S.J., Theology Department
Michael Kelly, J.D., Law School.

The forum was held Monday, February 24, from 3:30 - 5:00 in the Lecture Hall G4 in the New Science Building.


February 13, 2003

The Religious Uses of Modern Atheism

Professor Merold Westphal presented a public lecture on "The Religious Uses of Modern Atheism" as part of the Philosophy - Theology Lecture Series.

Merold Westphal is the Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University. Westphal's academic work focuses primarily on Continental philosophy, particularly regarding contributions to religion and politics. Westphal is the author of several books, including God, Guilt and Death: An Existential Phenomenology of Religion (1984) and Suspicion and Faith: The Religious Uses of Modern Atheism (1993). He is currently working on a book tentatively titled, Transcendence and Self-Transcendence.

The lecture was given at 7:00 p.m. in the Union Pacific Room. The lecture was co-sponsored by the Philosophy and Theology Departments.


November 9, 2002

Saints Alive! Rediscovering Heroes and Holy Ones for Today

Through speakers, art, and ritual, this all-day conference addressed the continuing relevance of saints for contemporary spirituality. The speakers were: Jeanette Rodriguez, Michael McGrath, OSFS, and Shawn Madigan. Original music by Martin Willett and Roc O'Connor, SJ.

The conference took place Saturday, November 9, from 9 am. - 4 pm., in the Skutt Student Center Ballroom.

The conference was co-sponsored with the Center for the Study of Catholicism, Cardoner at Creighton, Archdiocesan Office of Religious Formation, and the Nebraska Humanities Council.


October 31, 2002

After the Taliban: The United States and Nation-building in Afghanistan

What is the responsibility of the United States after war? The Critical Issues Forum addressed this question with two nationally recognized experts on the situation in Afghanistan.

Joining Roger Bergman, Moderator of the Critical Issues Fora and Director of the Justice and Peace Studies program, were:

Dr. Thomas Gouttierre, Director of the Center for Afghanistan Studies at the University of Nebraska at Omaha;
Raheem Yaseer, Campus Coordinator for the the University of Nebraska at Omaha Education Program for Afghanistan

The forum was held Thursday, October 31, from 3:30 - 5:00 in the Skutt Student Center, Room 104.


October 27-28, 2002

Food and Judaism

The Fifteenth Annual Klutznick-Harris Symposium explored the role of food in Judaism, past and present. The two day symposium, drawing speakers from around the United States, Great Britain, and Israel, was held at the Jewish Community Center on Sunday, October 27, and at Creighton University on Monday, October 28 in the Student Center Ballroom.

For further information, see the website of the Klutznick Chair in Jewish Civilization.

The proceedings of the symposium will be published in the Studies in Jewish Civilization series.


October 21, 2002

The Question of God Today

Professor Nicholas Lash presented a public lecture on "The Question of God Today" as part of the Philosophy - Theology Lecture Series.

Nicholas Lash, the Norris-Hulse Professor Emeritus of Divinity at the University of Cambridge, is an internationally recognized scholar and lecturer. Professor Lash has written eleven books, including the widely acclaimed Easter in Ordinary, edited five others, and composed some 350 essays, articles and reviews for various journals. He has been a visiting professor at numerous institutions, including University of Notre Dame, the University of San Francisco, University of Virginia, Boston College and Duke University. He has also served as editor for numerous journals.

The lecture was scheduled for Monday, October 21 at 7:00 pm. in the Skutt Student Center Ballroom East. The lecture was co-sponsored by the Philosophy and Theology Departments.


October 8, 2002

Pathways to Peace in the Middle East

The Critical Issues Forum considered what is required by Israelis and Palestinians to achieve peace in the Middle East conflict. The forum explored the common goals and particular present and future needs of each community in the conflict rather than assessed blame for present and past grievances.

Joining Roger Bergman, Moderator of the Critical Issues Fora and Director of the Justice and Peace Studies program, were:

Robert Wolfson, Regional Director of the Plain States Region of the Anti-Defamation League;
Dr. Naser Zaki Alsharif, Associate Professor of Pharmacy Sciences, and a Palestinian-American.

The forum was held Tuesday, October 8, from 3:30 - 5:00 in the Skutt Student Center, Room 105.


September 26, 2002

The Galileo Affair: The Myth and the Reality

Professor Richard Blackwell presented a public lecture on Galileo as part of the Science and Religion Dialogue Project.

Professor Blackwell is currently Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at Saint Louis University. He previously founded and directed the Program in the History and Philosophy of Science and held the Danforth Chair of Humanities at Saint Louis University. He has written numerous books and articles including, Galileo, Bellarmine, and the Bible. He was the 2001 Recipient of the Aquinas Medal, given by the American Catholic Philosophical Association.

The lecture was scheduled for Thursday, September 26 at 7:00 pm. in the Skutt Student Center, room 104.